SOCIAL JUSTICE FILM SERIES

Thank you all for participating in the first GoodCinema film series.
Stay tuned for announcements of upcoming events!

 

 WRONGFUL CONVICTION

WRONGFUL CONVICTION

CROWN HEIGHTS
October 16 | Alamo Drafthouse
Panel+Audience Discussion
Event photos

PANELISTS:
Kristy Martinez - Korey Wise Innocence Project
Michael Dougherty - Boulder District Attorney
Gail Johnson - Johnson & Klein Law
Mia Arrington - Sister of Abron Arrington (wrongfully convicted in CO)
Donna Rogers - Mother of Billy Edwards-El (wrongfully convicted in CO)

The third and final event of GoodCinema's social justice film series focuses on wrongful conviction with the award-winning drama, Crown Heights. Based on the true story adapted from This American Life, Colin Warner is wrongfully convicted of murder, and his friend, Carl King, devotes his life to proving Colin's innocence.

Following the film, the audience will engage in a discussion with a panel of experts, including attorneys and family members of the wrongfully convicted in Colorado, to explore how the issue affects us locally and what you can do to make an immediate direct impact.

FILM SUMMARY:
In 1980, a teenager is gunned down in the streets of Brooklyn, New York, and the police pressure a child witness to identify a suspect. As a result, Colin Warner, an 18-year-old kid from nearby Crown Heights, is wrongfully convicted of murder and sentenced to life in prison. Colin's childhood friend Carl 'KC' King devotes his life to fighting for Colin's freedom. He works on appeals, takes loans for lawyer fees and becomes a legal courier to learn the court system.

This incredible true story, winner of Sundance's coveted audience award in dramatic competition, is adapted from the acclaimed This American Life segment by writer/director Matt Ruskin, with Lakeith Stanfield playing Colin Warner and Nnamdi Asomugha as Carl King.

 

Past Screenings

 

SHORT FILMS:
IMMIGRANTS FOR SALE
IMMIGRANT PRISONS
DEPORTATION NATION
BEYOND THE WALL
September 11 | Sie FilmCenter
Panel+Audience Discussion
Event photos

PANELISTS:
Victor Galvan - Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition
Jorge Castañeda - Castañeda Law
Mekela Goehring - Rocky Mtn Immigrant Advocacy Network
Jamie Torres - Denver Office of Immigrant & Refugee Affairs
Greg Mortimer - Casa de Paz

The second event of our three-part film series on social justice explores an issue that has garnered widespread attention under Trump’s zero-tolerance, immigrant detention policy at the border. We will screen four short films, Immigrants for Sale, Immigrant Prisons, Deportation Nation, and locally produced Beyond the Wall. This will be followed by an audience discussion led by a panel of experts.

We are a country built by immigrants, but similar to various points in our country’s history, we find ourselves at a crossroads in the way our government is approach immigration issues. Families are fleeing their homes and coming to America with hopes of refuge and a fresh start, but instead of welcoming them, our government has taken a zero-tolerance policy to border security. The result has been families being separated and detained, due process being ignored, and a growing anti-immigrant rhetoric that is driving a wedge across America. Are we really safer by enforcing a hardline stance on immigration? Do immigrants take away or contribute to our economy? Why are refugees fleeing to our country, and what can we do as a community to humanely address this issue in a way that benefits our society? Let's talk about it.

 
 IMMIGRANT DETENTION

IMMIGRANT DETENTION

 WAR ON DRUGS

WAR ON DRUGS

THE HOUSE I LIVE IN
August 7 | Sie FilmCenter
Panel+Audience Discussion
Event photos

PANELISTS:
Kayvan Khalatbari - Harm Reduction Action Center
Art Way - Drug Policy Alliance
Elisabeth Epps - Denver Justice Project
Cody Boden - Second Chance Center

In the first event of our social justice film series, we take a look at the War on Drugs with a screening of The House I Live In, directed by Eugene Jarecki and winner of multiple awards, including Sundance Film Festival's Grand Jury Prize.

About the Film:
For the past 40 years, the war on drugs has resulted in more than 45 million arrests, $1 trillion dollars in government spending, and America’s role as the world’s largest jailer. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available than ever. Filmed in more than twenty states, The House I Live In captures heart-wrenching stories of those on the front lines — from the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge — and offers a penetrating look at the profound human rights implications of America’s longest war. (http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/films/house-i-live-in/)

Following the film we will engage with a panel of experts in an audience discussion about the social and local impacts on the drug war, ways to repair the damage, and how to overhaul a system that infringes on personal liberties, exploits people of color, and treats drug abuse as a crime rather than a health issue. The discussion will be followed by a call to action that offers clear next steps to be a part of the solution by getting involved with our partnering organizations.